Marjorie Spruill | Clinton School Presents

Marjorie Spruill

Interview with Marjorie Spruill.  Forty years ago, two women’s movements drew a line in the sand between liberals and conservatives. The legacy of that rift is still evident today in American politics and social policies.  Gloria Steinem was quoted in 2015 in The New Yorker as saying the National Women’s Conference in 1977 “…may take the prize as the most important event nobody knows about.”  After the United Nations established International Women’s Year (IWY) in 1975, Congress mandated and funded state conferences to elect delegates to attend the National Women’s Conference in Houston in 1977. At that conference, Bella Abzug, Steinem, and other feminists adopted a National Plan of Action, endorsing the hot-button issues of abortion rights, the Equal Rights Amendment, and gay rights – the latter a new issue in national politics. Across town, Phyllis Schlafly, Lottie Beth Hobbs, and the conservative women’s movement held a massive rally to protest federally funded feminism and launch a Pro-Family movement.  “Divided We Stand” reveals how the battle between feminists and their conservative challengers divided the nation as Democrats continued to support women’s rights and Republicans cast themselves as the party of family values.

Howard Bryant | Clinton School Presents

Howard Bryant

Interview with Howard Bryant.  Howard Bryant is an acclaimed sports journalist who writes for ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine and appears regularly on ESPN Radio. Bryant has been a panelist on ESPN’s The Sports Reporters since 2006 and is a sports correspondent for Weekend Edition with Scott Simon on National Public Radio.  Bryant is the author of four books. His latest book, “The Heritage,” is the story of the rise, fall, and fervent return of the athlete-activist. Through deep research and interviews with some of sports’ best-known stars – including Colin Kaepernick, David Ortiz, Charles Barkley, and Chris Webber – as well as members of law enforcement and the military, Bryant details the collision of post-9/11 sports in America and the politically engaged post-Ferguson black athlete.

Timothy McCarthy | Clinton School Presents

Timothy McCarthy

Interview with Timothy Patrick McCarthy.  Timothy McCarthy is an award-winning scholar, educator, and public servant. He holds a joint faculty appointment in Harvard’s undergraduate honors program in History and Literature, the Graduate School of Education, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government, where he is Core Faculty and Director of Culture Change & Social Justice Initiatives at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. Dr. McCarthy is also founding Faculty Convener of the Carr Center’s Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program.  A historian of politics and social movements, slavery and abolition, the art and literature of protest, media culture, and human rights, Dr. McCarthy is the author or editor of five books with the New Press, including The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition (2003), Prophets of Protest: Reconsidering the History of American Abolitionism (2006), and Stonewall’s Children: Living Queer History in the Age of Liberation, Loss, and Love(forthcoming).  Dr. McCarthy is the host and director of A.R.T. of Human Rights, a regular public series, co-sponsored by the Carr Center and the American Repertory Theater, that brings academics, artists, and activists together to explore the relationship between art and social change.  A frequent media commentator, Dr. McCarthy is featured in several documentary films, has appeared on NPR, BBC, CBS News, Air America, Bloomberg Radio, Al Jazeera, Democracy Now!, HuffPost Live, and Big Think, and has published essays in The Daily Beast, Salon, Boston Globe, Huffington Post, and The Nation.

Nadine Strossen | Clinton School Presents

Nadine Strossen

Interview with Nadine Strossen.  Mrs. Strossen is Professor of Constitutional Law at New York Law School and the first woman national President of the American Civil Liberties Union, where she served from 1991 through 2008.  HATE dispels misunderstandings plaguing our perennial debates about “hate speech vs. free speech,” showing that the First Amendment approach promotes free speech and democracy, equality, and societal harmony. We hear too many incorrect assertions that “hate speech” — which has no generally accepted definition – is either absolutely unprotected or absolutely protected from censorship. Rather, U.S. law allows government to punish hateful or discriminatory speech in specific contexts when it directly causes imminent serious harm. Yet, government may not punish such speech solely because its message is disfavored, disturbing, or vaguely feared to possibly contribute to some future harm.  Citing evidence from many countries, this book shows that “hate speech” laws are at best ineffective and at worst counterproductive. Their inevitably vague terms invest enforcing officials with broad discretion, and predictably, regular targets are minority views and speakers. Therefore, prominent social justice advocates in the U.S. and beyond maintain that the best way to resist hate and promote equality is not censorship, but rather, vigorous “counterspeech” and activism.

Emily Crane Linn | Clinton School Presents

Emily Crane Linn

Interview with Emily Crane Linn, Executive Director of Canopy Northwest Arkansas, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Emily Crane Linn, Executive Director of Canopy Northwest Arkansas, a resettlement center that provides refugees with everything they need to build a new life: from a place to live and language classes to counselors and babysitters. They help refugees learn English, put together a resume, evaluate their degree, and prepare for the American workforce. 

James Pardew | Clinton School Presents

James Pardew

Interview with Ambassador James Pardew, United States’ Ambassador to Bulgaria from 2002-2005, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ambassador James Pardew, he is the author of Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans, the first inclusive history of the successful multilateral intervention in the Balkans from 1995 to 2008 by an official directly involved in the diplomatic and military responses to the crisis. 

Luke Dittrich | Clinton School Presents

Luke Dittrich Clinton School.JPG

Interview with award winning journalist Luke Dittrich for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue with the distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Luke Dittrich, author of “Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets, the story of Henry Molaison, who lost the ability to create memories after he underwent a lobotomy to treat his seizures. His case taught scientists a lot about how the brain creates and stores memories. The case was one of personal tragedy for Molaison, but a boon for the modern landscape of medicine and science.

Dittrich is the grandson of William Scoville, the doctor who performed Patient H.M.'s lobotomy. Additionally, Dittrich is a National Magazine Award-winning journalist, and a contributing editor at Esquire.

Ambassador Jonathan Addleton | Clinton School Presents

Jonathan Addleton

Interview with Ambassador Jonathan Addleton, a five time USAID mission director, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ambassador Jonathan Addleton, a five time USAID mission director. He also served as US Ambassador to Mongolia, USAID Representative to the European Union and the US Senior Civilian Representative to Afghanistan. His book, “The Dust of Kandahar: A Diplomat Among Warriors in Afghanistan” provides a personal account of one diplomat’s year of service in America’s longest war. 

Kamilah Willingham | Clinton School Presents

Kamila Willingham

Interview with Kamilah Willingham for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Kamilah Willingham. Kamilah Willingham is an outspoken advocate and activist dedicated to gender equality, social justice, and human rights. She currently works as a program and outreach director at the California Women’s Law Center in Los Angeles. She previously worked for Just Detention International (JDI), an organization dedicated to ending sexual abuse in prisons and jails. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School, and received her undergraduate degree from Pomona College.

Amal Kassir | Clinton School Presents

Amal Kassir

Interview with Amal Kassir for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Amal Kassir, the daughter of an American mother and a Syrian father, who was raised in Denver but lived for many years in Syria. While living in Syria, she came to understand the suffering of the people there, especially rural farmers and children, while the freedoms she has living in the U.S. has allowed her to become an activist on their behalf. Now a college student in Denver, Kassir attends classes and works at her father’s Syrian restaurant during the week. On the weekends, she tours the United States performing her spoken word poetry at festivals and political rallies. In 2012, she won the Grand Slam prize at the Brave New Voices International Youth Competition for a poem called “Syria.” Her poetry often blends images of simple family pleasures in Syria with the contrasting harsh treatment of government soldiers, and over the last seven years of performing, the theme of Kassir’s poetry has evolved to a call of political and social justice.

Chelsea Halstead | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Chelsea Halstead for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Chelsea Halstead, a program manager for the Colibrí Center for Human Rights. She leads the Family Advocacy program, speaking with families to collect information on missing persons and making case matches by comparing reports to forensic data. The Center is a family advocacy nonprofit based in Tucson, Arizona that works with families, forensic scientists and humanitarians to end migrant death on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Erica Chenoweth | Clinton School Presents

This is a NPR interview for  "Clinton School Presents" with Erica Chenoweth. She is an associate professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver and an associate senior researcher at the Peace Research Institute of Oslo (PRIO). An internationally recognized authority on political violence and its alternatives, Foreign Policy magazine ranked her among the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2013 for her efforts to promote the empirical study of civil resistance. Though it defies consensus, between 1900 and 2006, campaigns of nonviolent resistance were more than twice as effective as their violent counterparts. Attracting impressive support from citizens that helps separate regimes from their main sources of power, these campaigns have produced remarkable results, even in the contexts of Iran, the Palestinian Territories, the Philippines, and Burma.

Josh Ruxin | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Josh Ruxin for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Josh Ruxin, assistant clinical professor of Public Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and the founder of Health Builders, which improves management systems in 86 health centers across Rwanda and has constructed 5 health facilities serving 150,000 people. He also the author of "A thousand Hills to heaven: love, hope and a restaurant in Rwanda."

Red Lines | Clinton School Presents

Mouaz Moustafa and Andrea Kalin

Interview with Mouaz Moustafa and Andrea Kalin for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Mouaz Moustafa and Andrea Kalin. Kalin is the producer and co-director of the documentary Red Lines, which follows Moustafa, the executive director of the Syrian Emergency Task Force as he advocates on behalf of the pro-democratic movement inside of Syria.

 

 

Wendy Young | Clinton School Presents

Wendy Young

Interview with Wendy Young for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Wendy Young, president of KIND (Kids In Need of Defense). KIND was was founded by Angelina Jolie and the Microsoft Corporation to create a pro bono movement of law firms, corporations, NGOs, universities, and volunteers to provide quality and compassionate legal counsel to unaccompanied refugee and immigrant children in the United States.

David Batstone | Clinton School Presents

Interview with David Batstone for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with David Batstone, co-founder and president of Not For Sale, an organization that fights modern day slavery around the world. By creating enterprise for vulnerable communities, offering social services to survivors and those at risk to human trafficking, and evaluating the use of forced labor in mainstream supply chains, Not For Sale works to make sure no human being is for sale.

Charles Kenny | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Charles Kenny for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Charles Kenny, author of Getting Better: Why Global Development is Succeeding. Kenny, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, discusses the considerable successes of development, pointing to global progress in health, education, civil and political rights, infrastructure and argues that new technologies and innovation are the driving forces for progress.

Ray Krone | Clinton School Presents

Ray Krone

Interview with Ray Krone, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ray Krone, who was wrongfully convicted of murder in Arizona in 1992. He spent 10 years in prison, including time on death row, before new DNA evidence led to his exoneration in 2002. He now travels the country raising awareness about wrongful conviction and speaking out against capital punishment.