Emily Crane Linn | Clinton School Presents

Emily Crane Linn

Interview with Emily Crane Linn, Executive Director of Canopy Northwest Arkansas, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Emily Crane Linn, Executive Director of Canopy Northwest Arkansas, a resettlement center that provides refugees with everything they need to build a new life: from a place to live and language classes to counselors and babysitters. They help refugees learn English, put together a resume, evaluate their degree, and prepare for the American workforce. 

Michelle Kuo | Clinton School Presents

Michelle Kuo Clinton School.JPG

Interview with Michelle Kuo, author of Reading with Patrick: A Teacher, a Student, and a Life-Changing Friendship, on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down Michelle Kuo, author of Reading With Patrick, who taught English at an alternative school in the Arkansas Delta for two years. Recently graduated from Harvard University, Kuo arrived in the rural town of Helena, Ark., as a Teach for America volunteer, bursting with optimism and drive. But she soon encountered the jarring realities of life in one of the poorest counties in America, still disabled by the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow. In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of one student, Patrick Browning, and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.

Frank Norris | Clinton School Presents

Frank Norris

Interview with Frank Norris, a historian with the National Park Service’s National Trails Office, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Frank Norris, a historian with the National Park Service’s National Trails Office. We discussed the Green Book on the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program. The Green Book was created by Victor H. Green, a postal service worker from Harlem New York. He began publishing the guide in 1936 to help African Americans avoid, as he put it, embarrassing moments after motorists started exploring long distance motorways including Route 66, the nation’s first transcontinental highway.

John Hope Bryant | Clinton School Presents

Interview with John Hope Bryant for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with John Hope Bryant, founder, chairman and chief executive Officer for Operation HOPE, whose mission is to make free enterprise work for everyone by working as a nonprofit private banker for the working poor, the underserved, and struggling middle class. Through Operation HOPE and its partners, Bryant is today responsible for more than $2 billion of private capital supporting low-wealth home ownership, small businesses, entrepreneurship, and community development investments in 300 U.S. cities, South Africa, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Gilbert King | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Gilbert King for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Pulitzer prize winning author Gilbert King. He is the author of “Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America,” which is about four black men falsely accused of raping Norma Lee Padgett, a 17-year-old white woman in Groveland, Fla. in 1949. It unearthed a largely forgotten chapter in the long history of racial injustice in the United States, and explored the tactics used by Thurgood Marshall, the future Supreme Court Justice, to chip away at the foundations of Jim Crow law.

Michael Ross | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Michael Ross for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Puplic Programs, sat down with Michael Ross, an author and associate professor of History at University of Maryland. In his new book, “The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case,” Ross offers the first full account of one of the events that electrified the South at one of the most critical moments in the history of American race relations. The book covers the kidnapping, where two African American women kidnapped seventeen-month-old Mollie Digby in front of her New Orleans home. From the moment it happens through the highly publicized investigation and sensationalized trial that followed, Ross paints a vivid picture of the Reconstruction-era South and the complexities and possibilities that faced the newly integrated society.