Michelle Kuo | Clinton School Presents

Michelle Kuo Clinton School.JPG

Interview with Michelle Kuo, author of Reading with Patrick: A Teacher, a Student, and a Life-Changing Friendship, on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down Michelle Kuo, author of Reading With Patrick, who taught English at an alternative school in the Arkansas Delta for two years. Recently graduated from Harvard University, Kuo arrived in the rural town of Helena, Ark., as a Teach for America volunteer, bursting with optimism and drive. But she soon encountered the jarring realities of life in one of the poorest counties in America, still disabled by the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow. In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of one student, Patrick Browning, and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.

Elaine Kamarck | Clinton School Presents

Elaine Kamarck

Interview with Elaine Kamarck, author of “Why Presidents Fail and How They Can Succeed Again”, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Elaine Kamarck, author of “Why Presidents Fail and How They Can Succeed Again”. Kamarck, director of the Center for Effective Public Management at the Brookings Institution, explains the difficulties of governing in our modern political landscape, and offers examples and recommendations of how our next president can not only recreate faith in leadership but also run a competent, successful administration.

Amal Kassir | Clinton School Presents

Amal Kassir

Interview with Amal Kassir for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Amal Kassir, the daughter of an American mother and a Syrian father, who was raised in Denver but lived for many years in Syria. While living in Syria, she came to understand the suffering of the people there, especially rural farmers and children, while the freedoms she has living in the U.S. has allowed her to become an activist on their behalf. Now a college student in Denver, Kassir attends classes and works at her father’s Syrian restaurant during the week. On the weekends, she tours the United States performing her spoken word poetry at festivals and political rallies. In 2012, she won the Grand Slam prize at the Brave New Voices International Youth Competition for a poem called “Syria.” Her poetry often blends images of simple family pleasures in Syria with the contrasting harsh treatment of government soldiers, and over the last seven years of performing, the theme of Kassir’s poetry has evolved to a call of political and social justice.

Michael Kammarman | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Michael Kammarman for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Michael Kammarman, press officer for the US Men’s National Soccer Team. In this edited conversation from his public program, he discusses the state of American soccer and his travels while working with the National team over the past 15 years.

Gilbert King | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Gilbert King for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Pulitzer prize winning author Gilbert King. He is the author of “Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America,” which is about four black men falsely accused of raping Norma Lee Padgett, a 17-year-old white woman in Groveland, Fla. in 1949. It unearthed a largely forgotten chapter in the long history of racial injustice in the United States, and explored the tactics used by Thurgood Marshall, the future Supreme Court Justice, to chip away at the foundations of Jim Crow law.

Charles Kenny | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Charles Kenny for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Charles Kenny, author of Getting Better: Why Global Development is Succeeding. Kenny, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, discusses the considerable successes of development, pointing to global progress in health, education, civil and political rights, infrastructure and argues that new technologies and innovation are the driving forces for progress.

Jonathan Katz | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Jonathan Katz for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Jonathan Katz, author of the book, “The Big Truck that Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster.” As the only full time American correspondent in the country when an earthquake hit on January 12, 2010, Katz stayed for another year to document how ordinary Haitians fared and the progress of the huge international effort to rebuild.

David Katz | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Dr. David Katz for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Dr. David Katz, founding director of Yale University's Prevention Research Center. Katz is the editor-in-chief of the journal Childhood Obesity, the only journal that provides a central forum for exploring effective, actionable strategies for weight management and obesity prevention in children and adolescents. He is also founder and president of the nonprofit Turn the Tide Foundation, which was created to help combat obesity by developing, evaluating and disseminating creative, yet practical programs that can be used in the real world for free.

Ray Krone | Clinton School Presents

Ray Krone

Interview with Ray Krone, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ray Krone, who was wrongfully convicted of murder in Arizona in 1992. He spent 10 years in prison, including time on death row, before new DNA evidence led to his exoneration in 2002. He now travels the country raising awareness about wrongful conviction and speaking out against capital punishment.

Karen Korematsu | Clinton School Presents

Interview with Karen Korematsu for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Karen Korematsu, co-founder of the Fred Korematsu Institute for Civil Rights, which is named for her father who spent 40 years fighting his 1942 arrest for refusing to be incarcerated in the government’s WWII internment camps for Japanese Americans. Founded in 2009 on the 25th anniversary of the vacated conviction, the Korematsu Institute advances pan-ethnic civil rights and human rights through education.