Rebecca Harper | Clinton School Presents

Rebecca Harper

Interview with Rebecca Harper.  In today’s world, the intersection of home and academic literacies often is non-existent. Yet, individuals practice sophisticated literacy skills on a daily basis. Unfortunately, these are often overlooked in lieu of traditional literacy practices.  As a literacy professor, reading and writing are Rebecca Harper’s areas of expertise, but she learned more from literacy tasks in real life than in courses taken during her doctoral program. Join her for a lecture in real world literacy as she shares what pinball, her mother’s eulogy, and ESPN taught her about literacy and how it transformed literacy practices.  Harper is and assistant professor of literacy in the Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation at Augusta University. She received her Ph.D. in Language and Literacy from the University of South Carolina. She is the author of “Content Area Writing that Rocks (and Works!)”.”

Marjorie Spruill | Clinton School Presents

Marjorie Spruill

Interview with Marjorie Spruill.  Forty years ago, two women’s movements drew a line in the sand between liberals and conservatives. The legacy of that rift is still evident today in American politics and social policies.  Gloria Steinem was quoted in 2015 in The New Yorker as saying the National Women’s Conference in 1977 “…may take the prize as the most important event nobody knows about.”  After the United Nations established International Women’s Year (IWY) in 1975, Congress mandated and funded state conferences to elect delegates to attend the National Women’s Conference in Houston in 1977. At that conference, Bella Abzug, Steinem, and other feminists adopted a National Plan of Action, endorsing the hot-button issues of abortion rights, the Equal Rights Amendment, and gay rights – the latter a new issue in national politics. Across town, Phyllis Schlafly, Lottie Beth Hobbs, and the conservative women’s movement held a massive rally to protest federally funded feminism and launch a Pro-Family movement.  “Divided We Stand” reveals how the battle between feminists and their conservative challengers divided the nation as Democrats continued to support women’s rights and Republicans cast themselves as the party of family values.

Bill Meyer | Clinton School Presents

Bill Meyer

Interview with Bill Meyer.  While the power of mindfulness and meditation have become well-known in the culture at large, their use in education is just beginning. But teachers who incorporate moments of stillness, breath awareness, and calming images know how potent these practices are for creating focus and facilitating learning.  “Three Breaths and Begin” is about practice, written by a schoolroom teacher who has shared these practices with students, teachers, and parents in a variety of real-world settings. Meyer details exactly how a teacher can use meditation techniques each and every day. From the very beginning of introducing the practice to students by creating a space within the classroom, to meditating on field trips, in sports setting, and in the midst of tragedy, he sets forth scripted meditations, with every aspect of conducting, running, and reflecting on the meditation considered.

Debby Schriver | Clinton School Presents

Debby Schriver

nterview with Debby Schriver.  Debby Schriver is a cult expert, an author, and a human rights activist whose projects connect us to common, core values that lift the human spirit. Schriver earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her study of psychological and sociological development began in college and has been an integral part of her career as an educator at UT and as a writer.  “Whispering in the Daylight: The Children of Tony Alamo Christian Ministries and Their Journey to Freedom” is based on numerous interviews from group members and, more importantly, on interviews with the children—second and third-generation followers.  Schriver chronicles how this group wpsyas formed, documenting its many abuses and its gradual adoption of cult-like behaviors and practices. Her extensive research – including interviews with Tony Alamo himself, harrowing visits to Alamo compounds, and witnessing gut-wrenching confrontations between freed children and their unreformed parents – tells the story of a closed group whose origins and history are unlikely ever to be definitively unraveled.

Dwayne Estes | Clinton School Presents

Dwayne Estes

Interview with Dwayne Estes.  Mr. Estes serves as executive director for SGI. For ten years Dwayne has served as Professor of Biology at APSU and was promoted to Full Professor in 2015.  Grassland loss is the single greatest conservation issue currently facing eastern North American biodiversity. Southern grasslands are nearly extinct and the species that depend on them are fading fast. The Southeastern Grasslands Initiative (SGI) is a collaboration of leaders in international biodiversity conservation led by the Austin Peay State University Center of Excellence for Field Biology, in partnership with the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, North Carolina Botanical Garden, and Roundstone Native Seed.  SGI seeks to integrate research, consultation, and education, along with the administration of grants, to create innovative solutions to address the multitude of complex issues facing Southeastern grasslands, the most imperiled ecosystems in eastern North America.

Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Díaz | Clinton School Presents

Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Díaz

Interview with Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Díaz.  Dr. Rodriguez-Díaz spent the spring 2018 semester as the Researcher in Residence and Visiting Philanthropy Faculty Scholar for the Clinton School’s Center on Community Philanthropy.  Rodríguez-Díaz is currently an associate professor in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Previously, he worked as a public health scientist and an associate professor at the School of Public Health at the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan.  He will share findings from research conducted during his residency that explore the role of race in emerging response and recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico.

Ellen Hart | Clinton School Presents

Ellen Hart

Interview with Ellen Hart, world-class runner and lawyer.  Mrs. Hart is known for her incredible athletic and professional achievements while going public about her battles with bulimia.  As an undergraduate student-athlete at Harvard, Hart earned eight varsity letters while competing in basketball, soccer, and track and field. She placed third to qualify in the 10K in the 1980 Olympic Trials and went on to break the world record in 20K and the United States record in 30K.  Hart earned her juris doctor from the University of Colorado Law School. She was an attorney with the Denver firm of Morrison and Foerster from 1988-90 and served as Executive Director of the Community Action Program at the University of Denver from 1990-92.  Hart was married to Federico Peña, the former mayor of Denver, United States Secretary of Transportation, and United States Secretary of Energy. She helped start the Eating Disorder Foundation while giving lectures and speaking publicly about her personal experiences.  A movie about her life, “Dying to be Perfect: The Ellen Hart Peña Story,” was released in 1996.

Luke Dittrich | Clinton School Presents

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Interview with award winning journalist Luke Dittrich for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue with the distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Luke Dittrich, author of “Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets, the story of Henry Molaison, who lost the ability to create memories after he underwent a lobotomy to treat his seizures. His case taught scientists a lot about how the brain creates and stores memories. The case was one of personal tragedy for Molaison, but a boon for the modern landscape of medicine and science.

Dittrich is the grandson of William Scoville, the doctor who performed Patient H.M.'s lobotomy. Additionally, Dittrich is a National Magazine Award-winning journalist, and a contributing editor at Esquire.

Ryan Hampton | Clinton School Presents

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Interview with Ryan Hampton for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue with the distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ryan Hampton, a recovery advocate. Nearly three years into recovery from a decade-long heroin addiction, Ryan Hampton is a prominent, leading face and voice of addiction and is changing the national dialog about addiction through social media. With content that reaches over 1 million people a week, Ryan has the largest following of any person in the addiction and recovery space. 

He was part of the core team that released the first-ever Surgeon General's report on addiction and was singled out by Forbes as a top social media entrepreneur in the recovery movement. Ryan connects a vast network of people who are passionate about ending the drug epidemic in America. His writing on recovery and addiction related issues regularly go viral in online journals such as HuffPo and The Hill.

Becky Straw | Clinton School Presents

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Interview with Becky Straw, co-founder and CEO of the Adventure Project, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue with the distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Becky Straw, co-founder and CEO of the Adventure Project, a nonprofit creating jobs in developing countries. Instead of giving money and products away, The Adventure Project works somewhat like a venture capital firm for effective nonprofits: funding entrepreneurial activity that will both provide jobs and help in the four most needed areas – water, hunger, health, and environment. The 10-year goal of the organization is to create one million jobs worldwide. Prior to The Adventure Project, Becky spent three years helping to launch Charity: Water, an organization bringing drinking water to people in developing countries.

Greg Simon | Clinton School Presents

Greg Simon

Greg Simon, Director of Biden Cancer Initiative at the Biden Foundation. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the White House Cancer Moonshot Taskforce. A position created by President Barack Obama for which he was chosen by Vice President Joe Biden in March of 2016. As Executive Director, he assembled and lead a team of eight professionals to support the work of the Vice President in developing and promoting the goals of the Cancer Moonshot. He also coordinated the work of the Taskforce comprised of twenty cabinet and subcabinet offices. 

Janine D'Anniballe | Clinton School Presents

Janine D'Anniballe

Interview with Dr. Janine D’Anniballe, Director of Trauma Services at Mental Health Partners for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Dr. Janine D’Anniballe. She’s been dedicated to the prevention, treatment and training of sexual assault issues for the past eighteen years. She is the Director of Trauma Services at Mental Health Partners in Boulder Colorado. Previously, she was the Executive Director of Moving to End Sexual Assault Rape Crisis Center in Boulder Colorado.

Alan Schwarz | Clinton School Presents

Alan Schwartz

Interview with former New York Times Pulitzer Prize nominated journalist, Alan Schwartz, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with the former New York Times Pulitzer Prize nominated journalist, Alan Schwartz. In his book, “ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic”, he examines the roots and the rise of this cultural and medical phenomenon. Is the definitive account of the widespread misdiagnosis of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, how its unchecked growth over half a century has made ADHD one of the most controversial conditions in medicine, with serious effects on children, adults, and society. 

Daniel Lucey | Clinton School Presents

Daniel Lucey

Interview with Daniel Lucey, a physician trained in infectious diseases and public health, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Daniel Lucey, a physician trained in infectious diseases and public health. He’s taught eleven years at Georgetown on global emerging infectious diseases. He’s travelled widely in Asia and the Middle East to exchange information regarding infectious diseases such as SARS, HIV and anthrax.

Ginny Atwood Lovitt | Clinton School Presents

Ginny Atwood Lovitt

Interview with Ginny Atwood Lovitt, executive director of the Chris Atwood Foundation, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Ginny Atwood Lovitt, executive director of the Chris Atwood Foundation, which works to provide recovery support and resources to people and families affected by addiction to change the conversation and policies about addiction from ones of stigma to support and to prevent the diseases from taking hold of future generations. The Atwood Foundation began in 2013, after the Atwood family lost their son and brother, Chris, to an accidental and fatal overdose.

Dana Suskind | Clinton School Presents

Dana Suskind

Interview with Dana Suskind, founder and director of the Thirty Million Words initiative, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with Dana Suskind, professor of surgery at the University of Chicago, director of the pediatric cochlear implant program, and founder and director of the Thirty Million Words initiative. Based on scientific research that shows the critical importance of early language exposure on the developing child, Thirty Million Words helps parents enhance their home language environment in order to optimize their child’s brain development and therefore, his or her ability to learn.

Jeremy Richman | Clinton School Presents

Jeremy Richman

Interview with Jeremy Richman, founder of the Avielle Foundation, for NPR affiliate KUAR on Clinton School Presents, a weekly dialogue of distinguished guests that visit the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nikolai DiPippa, Clinton School Director of Public Programs, sat down with with Jeremy Richman, founder of the Avielle Foundation. The Avielle Foundation was founded to prevent violence and build compassion through neuroscience research, community engagement, and education after Dr. Richman’s daughter, Avielle, was murdered in the Sandy Hook Elementary tragedy.